Goldschmidt2021: Abstract submission now open and conference format announced

New Geochemical Perspectives: Origins and Early Evolution of the Atmosphere and the Oceans

Time to join or renew your EAG membership!

Goldschmidt2021: Abstract submission open | Conference format announced

You can now submit your abstract for Goldschmidt2021 until 26 February. Also full details of the conference format as well as registration fees are available on the conference website. Derek Vance, EAG President, provides explanations about the conference format in this video.

New Geochemical Perspectives by Bernard Marty: ‘Origins and Early Evolution of the Atmosphere and the Oceans’

In this issue, Bernard Marty explores the origin and fate of volatile elements, i.e. those which form the atmosphere and the oceans and permitted the development of life on our planet. From the analysis of volcanic rocks, ancient atmospheric gases, and meteorites, we learn that the Earth is depleted in volatile elements when compared to its potential cosmochemical ancestors and that natural fluxes of carbon are two orders of magnitude lower than those emitted by current anthropogenic activity. Further insights have come from space missions that document the composition of the proto-solar nebula and the outer solar system. READ MORE

Geochemical Perspectives is an Open Access EAG publication.
The issue is currently in print and EAG members will receive it asap. Want to receive a print copy? Join or renew now

5 good reasons to join EAG or renew your membership!

1. Reduced registration fees at Goldschmidt conferences (see Goldschmidt2021 registration fees) and other events by EAG partners
2. Subscription to Elements and Geochemical Perspectives
3. NEW! Access to a networking platform allowing you to connect with other EAG members, including through a dedicated forum
4. Possibility to apply for sponsorship to attend (or organize) short courses and conferences
5. Support of EAG’s community journal Geochemical Perspectives Letters, open access and no page charges, as well as all programs funding early career scientists

Beyond the benefits you enjoy as a member, renewing your membership also shows your support to EAG, a non-profit society co-organizing the Goldschmidt Conference and taking initiatives for the good of the geochemistry community.  Join/Renew | View member benefits

EAG Blog: Uniting to Advance Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in a Pandemic and Post-Pandemic World

[By Amy Riches, Olivier Pourret and Susan Little] THE WORK There are significant numbers of highly-educated, well-trained, talented and hardworking people in geochemistry and wider Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths (STEM) fields… Read more

EAG Blog: Robotic field geologists will bring more samples from space!

[By Shogo Tachibana and Bernard Marty] We are living in an exciting period of time: samples from asteroids, the Moon, Mars, and hopefully comets are or will be returned to laboratories on Earth within the next one or two decades. These new materials will give us unpreceded views of the origin of… Read more

Derek Vance starts as EAG President

It is a great honour to become the President of the European Association of Geochemistry (EAG). I have just taken over from Sigurdur Gislason – “Siggi” – who has led EAG so brilliantly during his two years as President. As Siggi noted in this same piece two years ago, the governing structure of EAG, whereby the incoming President has just spent two years as Vice-President and is supported by the retiring President as “Past-President”, is a clever one… Read more

Introducing the EAG Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee

Geochemistry and cosmochemistry continue to be among the least diverse and most gated of all STEM disciplines. Accessibility and diversity in our science is critical to excellence and without it we are holding ourselves back; this view is a pillar of the EAG’s philosophy. We are excited to introduce the recently-formed EAG Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Committee, whose new webpage provides an introduction and reference point to the team. Over time, the committee will add greatly to the online resources and information available on the page. Find out more

 

EAG Deadlines

1 February: EAG Student Sponsorship application deadline
1 March: EAG Early Career Science Ambassadors application deadline
1 May: EAG Student Sponsorship application deadline

Goldschmidt2021 Deadlines

12 February: Grant application deadline (submission opens 15 January)
26 February: Abstract and Student Helpers application deadline (submission opens 15 January)
18 May: Early registration deadline

Recently published in Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Open Access EAG Publication

Latest Geochemical Perspectives: ‘Origins and Early Evolution of the Atmosphere and the Oceans’

In this issue, Bernard Marty explores the origin and fate of volatile elements, i.e. those which form the atmosphere and the oceans and permitted the development of life on our planet. From the analysis of volcanic rocks, ancient atmospheric gases, and meteorites, we learn that the Earth is depleted in volatile elements when compared to its potential cosmochemical ancestors and that natural fluxes of carbon are two orders of magnitude lower than those emitted by current anthropogenic activity. Further insights have come from space missions that document the composition of the proto-solar nebula and the outer solar system. READ MORE

Geochemical Perspectives is an Open Access EAG publication.

Latest Elements: ‘Noble Gas Thermochronology’

Noble-gas thermochronology takes advantage of two properties: (1) the time-dependent production of noble gases, such as helium and argon, by processes like radioactive decay; (2) the thermally activated diffusion of these gases to constrain the temperature histories of several minerals commonly found in crustal rocks. Because temperature is essential to many geological processes, thermochronology has become widely used to address research questions across Earth and planetary science. These questions include when and how valleys are cut by glaciers; from where is sediment sourced; what thermal conditions occur on fault planes during slip; and how the surfaces of planetary bodies evolve on billion-year timescales. READ MORE